[REQ] Une femme neuve (2000) (TV)

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Night457
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Re: [REQ] Une femme neuve (2000) (TV)

Post by Night457 »   0 likes

An upscale from standard VHS is problematic for sure. But what is the difference in quality or resolution between a 576 analogue broadcast recorded on DVDr, and a 576 DVD? Is it because one is interlaced and the other not? I know interlacing is correctable. Or are they both interlaced? And as for analogue vs digital -- a DVD is just a digital copy of an analogue source: film. Really, I am asking, not really arguing. Please explain if I am missing something.
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ghost
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Re: [REQ] Une femme neuve (2000) (TV)

Post by ghost »   1 likes

Well.. Explained in a few words: There are so many detais missing in the picture, that even the most inetelligent AI isn't able to recover them correctly. At least not in 2024.

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Night457
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Re: [REQ] Une femme neuve (2000) (TV)

Post by Night457 »   0 likes

Of course that clip is all we have and we do not have the recording details. But from the static on the edge and in the picture itself, it looks like a videotape recording. We have to assume it was over-the-air.

Also, the fact that it is only a clip available suggests that likely someone recorded the whole thing from televison and then decided that was the only part worth keeping. So they copied it to yet another videotape full of such clips. I heard that people did that in the old days. So later they copy their videotape copy of a videotape copy to a digital format, and share it on the internet. Of course it has lost detail. And people like me who want to see an entire movie and not just greatest hits material are annoyed! :lol:

I was interested in the hypothetical scenario where a digital recording (DVDr, DVR) was made in the first place from the broadcast, thinking perhaps wrongly what it would be comparable in quality to a pressed studio-released DVD. Mind you, *I* have never recorded television in that manner, so I can't really compare one to the other. The last time I captured a TV signal would have been in the mid-90s, on videotape.

I can understand that one needs enough detail in the first place to justify the AI enhancement, although I realize that is something where I have NO experience and you have plenty.
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